New Client Information

I am always taking select new clients, even when my schedule is full, but must prioritize my limited time for clients who share compatible values and goals. I strive to work as a team toward the improved health and soundness of your horse. I believe that open, clear communication is key to building a successful treatment team. Please review the following and if you think we may be a good match for a productive professional relationship to help your horse, please complete the new client form at the bottom of this page.

What you can expect from me:

  • My main coverage area is the North Shore of MA and southeastern NH. I have traveled farther for rehab cases in some instances, for a limited time, until the horse is more stable and we can find someone to take over their hoofcare.
  • I will make every effort to be on time to appointments. Occasionally a horse earlier in the day may need additional time, and if this happens, I will contact you about any delays as soon as possible.
  • I will send you an appointment reminder text the day before your appointment.
  • I will pursue continuing education in order to provide your horse with the best hoof care possible, keeping up with the latest research and ideas in hoof care and health. 
  • I will be patient and fair with your horse, and if I feel that behavior challenges make it unsafe or not possible for me to provide services, I will inform you and discuss possible solutions if interested. 
  • I will help you consider horse management, diet, etc to help grow the healthiest hooves possible. I believe in the whole horse approach to hoof care and will make suggestions based on my training if I notice something that might benefit from these changes.
  • I prefer working with your vet and/or bodyworker, especially for rehabs, and believe a cohesive team approach is critical for success on tough cases.
  • I will take notes about my trim and any concerns I have at the appointment, and leave you with a copy.
  • I am happy to answer questions or review photos between trim appointments.
  • I encourage clients to get involved, to learn, to have an open dialogue about hoof care and health. If you have interest in learning to do light touch up rasping between my visits, and if your horse’s hooves are suitable for this, I am happy to give you an old rasp and show you what you can do between appointments to take your horse’s hoof health to the next level. 
  • I offer a variety of hoof care and hoof protection solutions to fit your horses needs, such as hoof casts and various composite shoes. I have therapeutic Cloud boots available as well as nontoxic antimicrobial topical treatment for hoof infections. I am a dealer and have fit kits for several hoof boot companies and can help advise which model and size will likely work best for your horse. 

What I expect from clients:

Scheduling

  • Maintaining an appropriate trim cycle length is very important for optimal hoof health. Typically, this is 4-5 weeks for most horses in summer, in some cases extending to 5-6 weeks in winter.  Rehab cases may need trims more frequently, depending on pathology. Any horses with medial-lateral imbalance issues or cracks will especially need to maintain a short trim cycle. Owners who have interest in learning to do light touch ups with a rasp between appointments may possibly extend their trim cycle.
  • After each appointment, I will schedule the next appointment at that time. My schedule is usually booked pretty full a couple weeks out and it can be difficult for me to make short notice changes or add last minute appointments (except emergencies). 
  • It is really helpful for me if you have your horse ready to begin trimming at your scheduled appointment time. This helps keep my day on schedule.
  • My route is planned well in advance and last-minute changes can cause a lot of extra work or wasted time, and also affect other clients that day. Please make every effort to stick to our schedule and appointment times, as I seek to do the same, barring unsafe conditions or emergencies.
  • After the initial appointment, if you are unable to be present for our appointment time, I am usually willing to trim the horse by myself, provided it is in a stall or small close paddock, is easy to catch, and has good behavior. 

Working conditions

  • A clean, dry, safe workspace should be available, ideally free of manure and mud, with good lighting and firm flat footing where possible. When weather is pleasant, we may opt to work outside if the horse prefers, but shade is needed in warm weather, and cover or indoor space in inclement weather. Fans are greatly appreciated in the heat if you have them.
  • For glue on shoes appointments a clean, dry, firm, flat surface is a must! Concrete floor or rubber mats are ideal.
  • Please have the horse’s legs dry in the wet season if possible. Dry mud is preferable to wet legs that just got hosed. During bug season, please have fly spray ready as needed.
  • If our appointment is during feeding times, please do not feed other horses while I am working on your horse.
  • I may ask to observe the horse in motion. This will help me to evaluate your horse’s gait, evaluate hoof landings and distal limb biomechanics, make needed corrections, assess lameness, etc.

Horse behavior

  • Outside of pain-related issues, I expect the horse to be able to stand still for the trim without stomping, kicking, pawing, pulling legs away repeatedly, or biting. I am unable to work on dangerous or ill-behaved equines. 
  • Most horses stand better if they have had adequate turnout or exercise prior to the appointment. 
  • If the horse has pain issues that make it difficult to hold legs up for hoof care, please consult with your vet about possible medications that may help the horse be more comfortable on trim days.
  • While I am willing to be patient and allow the trim experience to be a positive one for your horse, I am not able to train your horse to learn to hold its feet up or stand for a trim; my focus is hoofcare and I do not have a training background. If the horse does not know how to stand quietly for hoof care, I may suggest that you work with a trainer if you are unable to train the horse yourself. 

If these considerations work for you and you think we are a good fit, I encourage you to fill out the information below!

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